After the Storm

I don’t claim to be a poet, but I try my hand occasionally, especially when I can’t stop thinking about something like what I found on my patio after a storm this week. I’ve spent way too much time trying to write Cinquains today, but I’m telling myself it’s good for my brain. I thought I’d share a few.

The Cinquain form was invented by the American poet, Adelaide Crapsy. Composed of five lines, constructed of 2, 4, 6, 8, 2 syllables, it makes a brief statement or captures an image.

 



Disaster Averted

To think
the broom would have
destroyed a home, had I
not noticed in time the twigs were
a nest.

  

Gratitude


I feel
grateful when I
find the bird nest hidden
beneath a clump of twigs to be
empty.

Concerned

After
the storm, I see
the nest lying under
debris and think where will Mom lay
her eggs?

 


Interior Design

Mama
weaves her nest with
neutrals before adding
fuchsia and translucent strands for
accents.



Celebration

I bet
she trilled with joy
and danced a jig after

swirling the bright tendrils inside
her nest.

… Your dwelling place is secure, your nest is set in a rock;  Numbers 24:21

Copyright © Dorothy Johnson 2014 All rights reserved


10 thoughts on “After the Storm

  1. Great cinquain sequence. I don't capitalize every beginning line. Does Ms. Crapsey? Cinquains are my form of choice now because I can comment, use personification, etc. that haikuists don't look kindly on (at least the experts).

    Like

  2. Thanks, Freeda. A friend who knows more about birds than I, thinks it's a mockingbird nest. There's a couple that spends time on the deck. Wishing I could put it back for them, but alas the tree is too tall.

    Like

  3. Thank you, Pat. I always feel good when you like my poetry. Truth is I don't know if Ms. Crapsey caps first lines or not. I'm still learning and appreciate your pointers. (Wouldn't you hate to have that last name!) I think it will be my choice too because the reasons you mentioned.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s